Misleading sales practices not a ‘systemic’ problem, telecom firms tell CRTC

Canada’s cable and internet companies are defending themselves against claims they have been misleading their customers and using aggressive sales tactics to sell services they may not want or need.

Four companies — Videotron, SaskTel, Cogeco Communications and Telus — appeared before the CRTC on Thursday. The commission is holding five days of hearings, investigating the sales practices of Canada’s telecommunications firms and looking at whether new rules are needed to protect consumers.

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Customers unimpressed after Telus forces transition to paperless bills

For the past two years, Vicki Warner has received her Telus bill in the mail. She liked it that way and still does.

But she won’t be getting paper bills anymore as of Nov. 1, when Telus goes paperless.

Warner, 75, says she didn’t get a say in the matter.

“I was surprised to see they were able to do that summarily,” said Warner, who lives in Sechelt, B.C., with her husband.

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Consumer groups advocate for new code of conduct, suitability rules on day two of CRTC hearings

A coalition of four Canadian consumer advocacy organizations delivered testimony on the second day of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) unsavoury telecom sales practices hearings. Representatives from the Fair Communications Sales Coalition (FCSC) — comprised of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now Canada (ACORN Canada), the National Pensioners Federation (NPF) and the Canadian Association of Retired Persons (CARP) — used their time to further advocate for the implementation of a new telecom sales code of conduct, while also arguing in favour of implementing suitability rules within Canada’s telecommunications industry.

Read more at MobileSyrup.com: Consumer groups advocate for new code of conduct, suitability rules on day two of CRTC hearings

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‘I feel cheated’: Telco customer set to speak on Day 1 of CRTC hearing into misleading sales practices

Shawn Ahmed says he knew he wanted to participate, as soon as he learned the CRTC asked to hear, in person, from consumers frustrated by their telecom service provider.

The federal telecom regulator is holding a five-day public hearing this week in Gatineau, Que., part of an inquiry into misleading and aggressive telco sales practices, ordered in June by the federal government.

“For the average consumer, this affects every one of us,” says Ahmed, a Rogers customer who outlined in his submission to the CRTC concerns that he was misled about price.

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Canadians’ experiences with large telecommunications service providers

Hello,

Today, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) launched an online survey to better understand Canadians’ experiences with large telecommunications service providers. This survey is part of the CRTC’s consultation which will result in a report to the government on whether misleading or aggressive retail sales practices are used by large telecommunications service providers, what their impact on consumers are as well as the potential solutions to strengthen the existing consumer protections.

In an effort to maximize participation, we kindly ask that you and the members of your organization complete the survey no later than September 7, 2018.

Get Involved – Promo Kit

We also need your help to spread the word. Some collaborative ways include:
• Share the content of this email with your members and across your networks;
• Follow us on Twitter (@CRTCeng and @CRTCfra) and on Facebook (@crtceng and @crtcfra), along with our LinkedIn where you can share, retweet, or like messages related to this initiative.
For more information about the consultation, please visit the links below:
Canadians are invited to share their experiences with telecommunications sales practices
Inquiry on use of misleading or aggressive sales practices by large telecommunications service providers

Thank you in advance for your collaboration.

Sincerely,

Nanao Kachi

Politique sociale et des consommateurs | Social and Consumer Policy
Directeur | Director
Consommation et politiques stratégiques | Consumer Affairs and Strategic Policy

Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes | Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N2

nanao.kachi@crtc.gc.ca
Téléphone | Telephone 819-997-4700
Télécopieur | Facsimile 819-953-7811
Gouvernement du Canada | Government of Canada
www.crtc.gc.ca
Suivez-nous sur Twitter | Follow us on Twitter

*****************************************************************************************************************************************************
Bonjour,

Aujourd’hui, le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes (CRTC) a lancé un sondage en ligne dans le but de mieux comprendre les expériences des Canadiens relativement aux pratiques des grands fournisseurs de services de télécommunication. Ce sondage fait partie du processus de consultation du CRTC, duquel résultera un rapport à l’intention du gouvernement qui déterminera si des pratiques de vente au détail trompeuses ou agressives sont adoptées par les grands fournisseurs de service de télécommunication. Le cas échéant, ce rapport établira l’impact de telles pratiques sur les consommateurs ainsi que les solutions potentielles visant à renforcer les mécanismes de protection des consommateurs actuels.

Dans le but de maximiser la participation, nous vous demandons de bien vouloir remplir ce sondage au plus tard le 7 septembre 2018 et d’inviter les membres de votre organisation à en faire de même.

Impliquez-vous – Trousse promotionnelle
Nous avons également besoin de votre aide afin de faire connaître le sondage. Voici quelques moyens de nous aider :
• Partagez le contenu de ce courriel avec vos membres ainsi qu’avec vos réseaux de personnes-contact.
• Suivez-nous sur Twitter (@CRTCeng et @CRTCfra), sur Facebook (@crtceng et @crtcfra) et LinkedIn, où vous pouvez partager, republier ou aimer les messages liés à cette initiative.
Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements au sujet du processus de consultation, veuillez consulter les liens ci-dessous :
Les Canadiens sont invités à faire part de leurs expériences relativement aux pratiques de vente de services de télécommunication
Enquête sur le recours à des pratiques de vente trompeuses ou agressives par les grands fournisseurs de services de télécommunication

Merci à l’avance de votre collaboration à cet égard.

Cordialement,

Nanao Kachi

Politique sociale et des consommateurs | Social and Consumer Policy
Directeur | Director
Consommation et politiques stratégiques | Consumer Affairs and Strategic Policy

Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes | Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N2

nanao.kachi@crtc.gc.ca
Téléphone | Telephone 819-997-4700
Télécopieur | Facsimile 819-953-7811
Gouvernement du Canada | Government of Canada
www.crtc.gc.ca
Suivez-nous sur Twitter | Follow us on Twitter

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Misleading or aggressive sales practices – submissions needed

Members are urged to participate with NPF and PIAC in representing consumers and the public in this Telecom Sales Practices inquiry and Report the CRTC is doing.

We believe NPF members may have many of these stories about Telco sales to tell and may well wish to submit them to CRTC or contact PIAC directly.

Here is the link to the CRTC Notice of Consultation and added below are the key questions for members about sales practices.

https://crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2018/2018-246.htm

to write directly to CRTC (via a not too easy to use form) Please note the submission deadline for this stage is 30 August 2018.

https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/CommentForm/Default-Defaut.aspx?lang=e&EN=2018-246&ET=N&S=O&PA=A&PT=A&PST=A&FN=

Here are the questions that are key to be answered.

Misleading or aggressive sales practices

  1. The OIC described misleading or aggressive sales practices as including providing consumers with incomplete, unclear or misleading information regarding service terms and conditions or selling them telecommunications services that are unsuitable for them.

       Q1. In your interaction with a service provider, do you think the service provider used plain language that was easy to understand?

      Q2. Have you experienced misleading or aggressive sales practices from a service provider? If so, provide details about that experience, including the service provider and service in question, when and how the sales interaction occurred, the nature of the sales practice used, and what avenues you may have used to address the sales practice.

      Q3. In your opinion, are bundles of services, and any associated discounts, a source of confusion? Why? What telecommunications and/or television services were included or offered to be included in the bundle?

Additional questions for Canadians who may be particularly vulnerable to misleading or aggressive sales practices

  1. The OIC noted that vulnerable Canadians, such as those who are vulnerable due to their age, a disability, or a language barrier, are more likely to be impacted by misleading or aggressive sales practices.

       Q4. As a Canadian with a disability, did you find that the service provider accommodated your needs to ensure that you were able to make an informed decision about the telecommunications and/or television services sold or offered for sale? If so, how? If not, what else do you think could have been done to help you to make an informed decision in respect of the sales interaction?

      Q5. As an older Canadian, did you find that the service provider made an effort to ensure that you were able to make an informed decision about the telecommunications and/or television services sold or offered for sale? If so, how? If not, what else do you think could have been done to help you to make an informed decision in respect of the sales interaction?

      Q6. As a Canadian with a language barrier, did you find that the service provider made an effort to ensure that you were able to make an informed decision about the telecommunications and/or television services sold or offered for sale? If so, how? If not, what else do you think could have been done to help you to make an informed decision in respect of the sales interaction?

Finally, you can contact PIAC directly to share your story John Lawford, Public Interest Advocacy Centre

Tel: 613-562-4002 x25    Fax:  613-562-0007

lawford@piac.ca  |  http://www.piac.ca

Thank you for your attention to this important matter that impacts our most vulnerable citizens.

 

National Pensioners’ Federation

2186 Stanfield Road
MississaugaL4Y 1R5
Canada
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Telecom Decision CRTC 2014-101 Wireless Code – Request by DiversityCanada Foundation to review and vary Telecom Regulatory Policy 2013-271 regarding expiry of prepaid wireless service cards

Pursuant to Section 12 of the Telecommunication Act, the DiversityCanada Foundation and the National Pensioners Federation are submitting this Petition to the Governor in Council.

The Petitioners request that the Governor in Council issue an Order to vary Telecom Decision CRTC 2014-101 so as to acknowledge errors in law inherent in the decision; quash Section J of the Wireless Code; and establish a new hearing to reconsider the prohibition of prepaid wireless balance expiry.

The Petition is accompanied by six appendices, labelled Appendix A – F.

-Telecom Decision CRTC 2014-101 Wireless Code – Request by DiversityCanada Foundation to review and vary Telecom Regulatory Policy 2013-271 regarding expiry of prepaid wireless service cards

-Petition to the Governor in Council to Vary

Appendix A – F
Appendix A: Detailed Description of Prepaid Wireless Services
Appendix B: Detailed Description of Prepaid Wireless Balance Expiry
Appendix C: Summary of the DiversityCanada Foundation’s submissions during the Wireless Code Proceeding
Appendix D: Evidence Presented By the DiversityCanada Foundation during the Wireless Code Proceeding
Appendix E: Evidence Presented By the Public Interest Advocacy Centre during the Wireless Code Proceeding
Appendix F: Intervention by Vaxination Informatique to the Part I Proceeding To Review and Vary the Wireless Code Decision

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CRTC Stands Idle Choosing Not to Help Canadians Gain Access to Affordable Internet.

“The CRTC said Internet is essential to participate in Canadian society and the digital economy,” said Trish McAuliffe, Interim President of the NPF. “But then they refused to do anything to help.”
Jan 25/18 – The Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), ACORN Canada (ACORN) and National Pensioners Federation (NPF) today reacted negatively to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) rejection of their review of the CRTC’s previous decision to deny creating a fund to ensure all Canadians, including lower-income Canadians, have equal access to broadband and other telecommunications services.
John Lawford, Executive Director and General Counsel at PIAC, said “We are once again shocked that the CRTC will do precisely nothing to support affordable internet access. They are widening the digital divide by saying ‘it’s not our problem.’”

Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now Canada, the National Pensioners Federation, and the Public Interest Advocacy Centre – Application to review and vary Telecom Regulatory Policy 2016-496 regarding affordability

The Commission denies an application from the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now Canada, the National Pensioners Federation, and the Public Interest Advocacy Centre to review and vary the Commission’s determinations in Telecom Regulatory Policy 2016-496 regarding the affordability of telecommunications services.

Read More: http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2018/2018-31.htm

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